Archive for February, 2015

Let’s Hear it for Mary Claire Kelly!


Written on February 12, 2015 at 1:09 pm, by Melissa Swindell

The Wren’s Nest’s very own Mary Claire Kelly did something great. Not that we’re surprised or anything. Anyone who’s apart of the Wren’s Nest Team, the young scribes, their mentors, Brer Rabbit, Uncle Remus, Mr. Harris, they never fail to impress us around here.

One of our Brown Middle School mentors had an article featured on WABE 90.1FM, Atlanta’s NPR News Station. Can someone say complete awesomeness?

Mary-Claire-Kelly

Kelly’s article was featured as a part of WABE’s Beautiful City series, where journalists are showcasing special places to go in Atlanta for those of us who love Atlanta too much and just don’t want to leave, or simply for those who have been in Atlanta for a while and have yet to get “culturally acquainted”  (Side note: If you’re looking to get culturally acquainted, right here at the Wren’s Nest is a perfect place to start!)

Anyway Let’s clap it up for Mary Claire Kelley. She highlighted the Lake Claire Community Land Trust. Pretty interesting if I do say so myself!

Go ahead and check it out. Here’s the link to view the pictures, read the article, and listen to the podcast. Great Job Mary Claire Kelly! http://bit.ly/1FD9EfF

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Categories: Storytelling |

Our Words for Goodwin


Written on February 5, 2015 at 1:30 pm, by Melissa Swindell

George Goodwin died last week. Born and raised right around the corner from us, George left the entire nation with a wonderful example of what it means to make a difference. Well known for being the first Atlanta journalist to win a Pulitzer Prize for distinguished local reporting in his 1947 series exposing voter fraud in Telfair County, Georgia, George played a major role in shaping Atlanta’s transformation from a rural town to the cultural metropolitan area that it is today. “Be it planning for growth and development; sustaining libraries and the arts; promoting philanthropy; improving education; advancing race relations or encouraging civic responsibility, George Goodwin was a force for progress and understanding.”

Back in the day The Wren’s Nest was a Carnegie Library – at least one room was. George told me he spent hours and hours as a boy reading at The Wren’s Nest. He claimed that those hours were a big part of his love of the written word and development as a writer. I only met him the last couple years of his life but it was clear that in addition to his wit and heart, his charm was a big part of the legacy he leaves and the example he set for us all of a life of service. He was 97.

 

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Categories: Storytelling |